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Athletic Administration; Choose the Path of a Lifelong Learner

August 18, 2020

Athletic Administration

The field of athletic administration is one that many athletes dream about. For those with a passion for sports, the chance to facilitate programs that develop athletes of character and produce victorious seasons just can’t be topped. Kate Greabeiel, from Edmonton Alberta, CN, is one of these individuals who has found that athletic administration is the career for her.

What’s Athletic Administration Like in Canada?

athletic administration job Kate is the Athletic Director and Department Head of Physical Education at Lillian Osborne High School in Edmonton. (The school is located just a few hours from the widely known Banff National Park.) Her career in teaching has spanned over 19 years, and she’s served in the role of athletic administration for the past 16. 

We asked Kate what it’s like to be an AD in Canada.

It turns out, things are quite different than they are in the U.S. First of all, her PE teaching job is considered her full-time position. Her role as an AD is more of an “extra” for which she is paid a stipend. This makes it difficult for her to prioritize her tasks as the athletic director. Oh, and we should mention — she doesn’t just lead and direct the coaches — she is a coach herself. Greabeiel coaches varsity women’s volleyball, co-ed track and field, and men’s/women’s handball. All of this together creates a full load for Kate. 

How did Kate Find Grace College? 

athletic administration A few years ago, Kate was at a CIAAA (Canadian Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association) conference. She was taking some of the LTC’s (Leadership Training Course) that were offered there. As she meandered her way through the convention center, she stumbled upon a Grace College booth. The American man sitting at the booth was friendly and easy to talk to. But Kate had to admit, she wondered what a college in the U.S. was doing at a Canadian conference. 

After a conversation with the man (we know him as Dr. Johnson), Kate found that Grace had an amazing master of athletic administration program that allowed students to work at their own pace. Not only was it CIAAA accredited, but it was extremely affordable.

Who would have thought that a stop at a booth would lead to three-and-a-half years of self-guided learning about athletic administration! Kate enrolled that summer of 2016.

What was it like to study Athletic Administration?

In a word: flexible. Kate explained that the adaptability of the program was key. “Dr. Johnson was always super flexible and made the projects applicable to me and the environment I teach and work in,” said Kate. “I loved the functionality of the program.”

Kate conferred her degree in December of 2019. After three-and-a-half years of LTCs, improvement projects and analyses of Lillian Osborne High’s athletics, Kate hopes to move up into an administrator position. This would not be possible without her master’s in athletic administration.

 

Why get a Master of Athletic Administration Degree?

athletic administration degreeThere are a lot of benefits to getting an advanced degree.

The monetary benefits were hard to refuse. Not only was Kate’s degree funded by her school, but it would lead to a salary increase in the future. It was a no-brainer — all she had to do was say “yes!”

At the end of the day, Kate chose to get her graduate degree and put in the hard work as a response to the charge she gives her students on a regular basis: never stop learning. “As educators, we always impress on our students the importance of being a lifelong learner. This degree was me taking that step myself,” said Kate.

Now with her degree in hand, Kate has physical proof that the call to be curious about the world and get serious about generating impact wasn’t just a charge she gave — it was a life she lived. 

If you are interested in our master of athletic administration degree, contact Dr. Johnson at dljohnson@grace.edu.